403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
© 2014 Marla McLean heart horizontal

All These Questions Are Love

This is the view from my window right now.
winter

Another snow day.

A day to reflect and catch up on blogging.

 February just ended.

It’s when the Love Fairy visits SWS.
love fairy I adore Valentines Day.

The opportunity to “make” for others, to write, draw, wrap, and give to others-just for the sake of the day is worth all the commercialized advertisements for diamonds and dinners.

 
What does love have to do with learning?
What’s love got to do with it?

 
I was thrilled to engage my PreSchool children in making a sewn, beaded, wrapped Valentine for someone in their family.

olive 

It was a first time sewing for the children. The pulling and pushing just the right amount without creating tears or big loops of thread, flipping the card, finding a new hole to go through.
xymya sews
miles

The concentration and dexterity paired with the tactile feel proved to be worth the focus. Every child stuck with their sewn Valentine through completion. 
IMG_4679The next week the children beaded, made a card, and wrapped the Valentine.
cardThis is a lot of work.

Wrapping a gift was also a new experience for many. A tape dispenser alone offers a challenge, and then learning to connect two pieces of paper with one piece of placed tape, without getting it all stuck together.
Bryce wrapping

These rituals and skills of Valentine making, and giving children the opportunity to “do” is no different from all the other learning experiences. Except this one, this project has the ultimate impetus of love.

 Hidden in all the rigor of managing materials, using new tools, staying focused for extended periods, and persevering in new tasks is the anticipation of giving.

wrapped 

I asked the PreSchool children, What is love?

 

Hard question.

 

You try answering it, let alone only being on this planet 3 to 4 years!

 

Their responses were moving, thoughtful, and thought provoking.
IMG_4411

oskar gift
miles gift
IMG_4683
caleb gift
IMG_4682
IMG_4418
The multi-layered work they did gave me opportunities to assess many skills. Language, connection to content and comprehension, fine motor skills, following multiple-step directions, staying focused to complete tasks, overcoming difficulty.

 Their conversations and language went deep, and they became a small connected group in conversation.

The children  were motivated. Love.

Working with the medically fragile children,I can clearly state love also is a part of learning. I have a weekly challenge of bringing materials-based experiences that bring joy, discovery, and that each child can in some way participates in.
angel
teachers
IMG_4637
IMG_4635
Each child must also feel safe enough to trust all the strange sounds, textures, mess, and sights that I entice, cajole, engage, and impose on them. Love.

 In the PreK classes, there is a long-term project that has had it’s starts and stops and starts and stops again  as holidays and winter storms came and went. 

It’s Fairy Houses.

It started as a way to work on engineering and building sturdy structures.

It was developed to engage the children in looking closely and seeing natural materials as viable materials and metaphors in expressing themselves.
Barrett Natire Collection

I want the children to notice and be able to differentiate between artificial and natural materials.
anais

I want them to realize that constructing is multi-layered, requiring understanding of space, gravity, and design.

cora
 I want the children to think about when something needs to be drilled as opposed to hammered or glued, and how to determine what drill bit is best.

andrew jack
I want them to realize you can only work on one side at a time, one three dimensional surface.

Ingrid adding beans
Battett

I want them to have the experience of extended periods of making that allow enough repetition that they can master parts and press on to harder and more demanding solutions and ideas.

sasha
I wanted them to have time and space to step away before they make their next decision. Time to interact and share with each other.

IMG_4578

It is happening.

josh

It is the love of this work that is motivating them to continue to come in and get to work. It is theirs.

josh table

It is theirs because the very intentional long-term studio practice and habits have transformed them into children that are independently able to take the next step on their own, or with the help of a friend. They are able to build upon their competencies and go deeper.

drill partners

Zeke

One work period, there was a commotion and excitement:
rainbowIMG_4571IMG_4570IMG_4572
It’s a rainbow!
The fairies did it!
I think they are already visiting our houses.
They are visiting my house, I know.
They are going to visit everyone’s house!
We made them a fairy city!
Wait, it went away!

Where did it go?
 
“In a culture obsessed with measuring talent, ability, and potential, we often overlook the important role of inspiration in enabling potential.

Inspiration awakens us to new possibilities by allowing us to transcend our ordinary experiences and limitations. Inspiration propels a person from apathy to possibility, and transforms the way we perceive our own capabilities. Inspiration may sometimes be overlooked because of its elusive nature. Its history of being treated as supernatural or divine hasn’t helped the situation. But as recent research shows, inspiration can be activated, captured, and manipulated, and it has a major effect on important life outcomes.” – Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.,

Co-founder of The Creativity Post; Author of Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined

 
If you are inspired, you love something. That something is what allows you to override the difficulties and setbacks, the mistakes and frustrations. This love of something/inspiration is the necessary foundation for perseverance to occur when the work is hard.

 

The Kindergarten children have been engaged in a project inspired by The Cabinet of Curiosity or Wonder.

These rooms filled with collections began before museums existred in the 15th century. 
cabinet b and w
After looking at objects as having meaning with their families, I wanted to present the experience of how people have historically looked at objects and have access to objects. 

A trip was planned to go to The Walters Museum to view their Cabinet of Wonder.
I began to ask hard questions again. Instead of What is love? It was What is wonder, What is Curiosity? What do you think a Cabinet of Curiosity or Wonder is?

 

We are going to go see A Cabinet of Wonder or A Cabinet of Curiosity. What do you think this might be?

 Isaiah: Something you open up and there’s stuff inside. Can we open it?

 Anyone else?

 Silence.

 What is “wonder”?

 Maggie: It’s when you think inside your head about something that you love.

 Mira: I don’t think you love something you wonder about because if you are curious you don’t know about it. So you don’t love it, yet.

Can we make a Cabinet of Curiosity ourselves?!!

 That’s a really interesting idea.

 How about if you start by thinking of a time you were outside of Washington, DC. Think about an object of wonder from somewhere you visited. It can be something you saw, found, or bought that you would NOT encounter in DC.

 Willa: I was in the woods. I don’t know where but it was outside Washington, DC and I found this leaf with yellow and orange and I brought it home.

 Mira: I saw a jellyfish n Florida

 Ainsley: At Cape Cod Beach, a wave.

 Maggie: A dead snail in a seashell in New York, where the Statue of Liberty is.

 Ibby: A sand dollar at the beach house, I don’t know where but I’ll ask.

 Noah: I saw a dead shark at the beach.

cabinet web

We are going to go see A Cabinet of Wonder or A Cabinet of Curiosity. What do you think this might be?

 Rowan: A cabinet and you wonder what’s inside of it.

 Audrey: A drawer.

 Dominic: A place where you can keep all your treasures.

 Lusa: A cabinet you open and wonder what it is for.

 Tate: You guess what’s inside it. If you don’t get it right, you don’t open it.
book

We are going to go see A Cabinet of Wonder or A Cabinet of Curiosity. What do you think this might be?

 Isaac: It means you go in it and it feels fun and there’s all kinds of delicate stuff.

 Percy: It’s a tunnel and it has weird weird stuff and you wonder in your brain what it is.

 Collette: I think it has toy Barbie’s and a toy museum.

 Jordan: Maybe it has dinosaur bones.

 Lucinda: I think it has tiaras and crowns.

 What is wonder?

 Evan: Wonder is something you see and you really like it but you don’t know what it is.

 Sonora: Wonder means you know something but you don’t know what it is.
wonder web3

We are going to go see A Cabinet of Wonder or A Cabinet of Curiosity. What do you think this might be?

 Ryan: A room with lots of collections.

 Eric: All different stuff from old times.

 Tali: I think it’s like a place where you keep really cool stuff. Wondering is thinking about the cool stuff you see.

 Hazel: I think a Cabinet of Wonder is where lots of people wonder, What’s in it?

 Eric: Yeah, like people say, “What is this?”

cabinet web4

 

We are going to go see A Cabinet of Wonder or A Cabinet of Curiosity. What do you think this might be?

 Aurora: When you open a cabinet and you wonder about it a lot.

 Gabriel M.: I think it’s something you wonder about, you just think.

 Liam: It means you don’t have any idea what’s in the cabinet.

 Samuel: I think it’s a person inside a cabinet.

 Madeline: If you heard there was something inside the cabinet and you didn’t know what it means, you wonder what it’s about.

 Gabriel: Curious is Wonder!

(At the Walters Museum in Baltimore, MD)
whole chamber

 

The Kindergarten children went on the road trip to The Walters Museum of Art in Baltimore, MD.

 riley

While there, children went on a scavenger hunt, picked three objects to sketch (to later be written into classroom “Wonder Stories,”) engaged in a strory-telling circle inspired by the objects around them, and were read books about mummies and armor as they sat surrounded by the real objects.

dylan and tate2dylan and Tate
gabriel m and Tibbie
They LOVED this.

wondering

Each child found inspiration that resonated within from the walls of the Cabinet of Wonder.

looking
cobra
draw
chamber
Children, parent chaperones, and teachers returned from the trip with ideas, excitement, and enthusiasm. We also came back with rich resources to take this project in divergent directions.

I explained that travel used to be just for a very few rich people. Most people never left where they lived. That meant, if you were born n Washington, DC, at a time before museums, you would not see a Palm Tree or a desert. You would only see the geography and culture of the people who you lived with. Unless you had the opportunity to visit a very wealthy person’s Cabinet of Wonder.

Prior to the trip, the children were already planning to create their own Cabinet of Curiosity. The children pulled out their sketches of an object they saw, collected, or bought when traveling outside of Washington, DC. These objects range from Grandpa’s old toy collection on a shelf in Pennsylvania to tall buildings with TV screens in NYC to an outdoor shower in North Carolina.

Wanting to put this in a context to make them aware also of Georgraphy, the children have begun a new strand of this project. They mapped where their personal object of wonder is located on a map in the studio.

mapping
Mapping. 

What is a map?

Liam: It’s something to find out where something is.

Madeline: It shows you different countries and cities.

Gabriel: To lead you where you want to go.

Samuel: Sometimes you get what you want. Like treasure. It shows you with arrows. Like a pirate map.

Benjamin: It helps you how to get home.

Looking at the map and noticing the land and water, Isabel added this: 
There’s less where we can stand and more where we can drown.

Rowan: If you want to go to a jungle, you might want to look at a map.

Tate: A map is so if you get lost or if you wanna see where the world is.

Riley: A map is to look ahead.

Lusa: To see where you are.

audrey maps
Only two children out of two classes knew where to find a location on the maps.

Percy new exactly where Idaho was. He told me he has a map puzzle so that’s why he knows. The other kids were very interested in how far Idaho was.
Idaho Percymap us
With hints, eventually all the locations were found. A world map was added because several children had objects of wonder outside the US, like Audrey, Ryan, Madeline. and more.
Madeline maps Japan

ryan mapping

 ryan mapping costa rica

Most children are growing up with GPS devices as their maps. How does this effect the concept of mapping and the related lessons that Geography brings?

 
Here is an article that shows an alarming trend, American Schoolchildren Appear Lost in Latest Study of Geography Aptitude

 From this article,

 “Students aren’t learning subjects such as geography and history as teachers spend more time on math and reading to accommodate standardized tests, said Roger M. Downs, a Pennsylvania State University geography professor.

As “classroom time becomes an even more precious and scarce commodity, geography, with subjects such as history and the arts, is losing out in the zero-sum game that results from high- stakes testing,” Downs said in a statement released with the results.”

 and

 “Geography “provides the context for understanding many of the complex social, political and economic relationships that exist in our world,” said Garrison.”

 
Having the maps has created cross-fertilazation for all children using the studio.

Every group seems to question and interact with the display of maps. Just last week a three year old said to me, “…hey, why do you have these planets on the wall?”

 
The individual Objects of Wonder are now a blueprint for creating a Kindergarten Cabinet of Curiosity.

Similar to the Fairy house project, with more complexity-the children are slowly developing what steps to do next as they begin to visually represent in the context of the 15th-17th Century phenomenon.

Repurposed cigar boxes, some broken apart are being transformed.

For many, it means following plans to create and determine background colors that makes sense for the object.

paint
painting
Aksel paint
Using clay, representations are being made and added as a three dimensional object to fit inside the cabinet. Scale, correct use of craft to ensure the clay objects are strong, and thought to making the clay clearly express their idea are just some of the challenges the children are facing.

Percy making the log home he stayed in when in Idaho with his family.
percy plans
Kamrin working on representing a wall of stuffed animals of every sort he saw in Virginia.
Kamrin making stuffed animals
Lilah trying to figure out how to create the outdoor shower she saw.
Lilah outdoor clay shower
The children who experienced the ornate cabinets and chambers filled with cabinets at The Walters Museum are also using mosaic and gold and silver paint to give their cabinet a historic design.
mosaic
Every child has to manage where they are in the project, what materials they need, how to use, care for, and clean up the materials, what to do next, and what to do when something falls apart, or just doesn’t work out.

Love in learning is not an “extra”. Children who are motivated will push themselves to persevere in all domains of learning when they have the drive to do so. Isn’t that the same for adults?

 I am ending the post with an article I read recently, Save your Relationships: Ask the Right Questions. Before you skip the rest because it sounds like a horrible self-help text consider the subtitle:

 “A caring question is a key that will unlock a room inside the person you love”

 (I would also say in the school context,  A caring provocation will unlock a room inside the people you love and teach.)

The act of teaching, parenting, and being in a relationship is the ability to provoke both understanding and expression.

 How often have parents said to me, “My child never tells me what they did all day. How do you get them to do this?”

 Here’s some examples from the article

 
“How did you feel during your spelling test?

What did you say to the new girl when you all went out to recess?

Did you feel lonely at all today?

Were there any times you felt proud of yourself today?

 And I never ask my friends:  How are you? Because they don’t know either.

Instead I ask:

How is your mom’s chemo going?

How’d that conference with Ben’s teacher turn out?

What’s going really well with work right now?”

 This article concludes by saying

“Questions are like gifts – it’s the thought behind them that the receiver really FEELS. We have to know the receiver to give the right gift and to ask the right question. Generic gifts and questions are all right, but personal gifts and questions feel better. Love is specific, I think. It’s an art. The more attention and time you give to your questions, the more beautiful the answers become. “

 Sound familiar?

That’s because when I asked the PreSchool children, What is love?,  Miles’ response summed up the above text.

 He said:

“All these questions are love.”

heart horizontal(Early Childhood sanctioned hall graffiti. 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

4 Comments

  1. Maurice Tome
    Posted March 3, 2014 at 9:27 pm | #

    I appreciate the many layers here. I am trying to figure out a clean thought to share, but I am finding a lot to wrestle with. Here is where your blog is taking me right now:

    Love mixing with and/or being composed of various layers of inspiration, mechanical and conceptual and social competencies, self-expression, representation of moving experiences, connecting one’s passion and wondering with others, and more…

    Is love something different when received as an inspiration compared to when it is expressed in some physical, observable, or shared form?

    I have been thinking a lot about how interconnected these many “skills” we are working to help children learn/develop are. We can choose to see them in isolation, but can they be internalized without existing in connection with rich and meaningful contexts? We can learn to follow a script to ask certain kinds of questions in certain situations, but if we cannot listen to, see, feel, connect to, and patiently react to the people we are talking with, if we cannot care and show love for them, how can we fully hear what they are saying? How can we really ask the right questions? How do we grow this in ourselves as well as in our students?

    Thanks for the posting. Lots to keep thinking about.

  2. Posted March 4, 2014 at 6:48 am | #

    It is always worth waiting for your posts, Marla – they are a lovely journey in and of themselves, as I get to peek into all your work with children. You know I loved the sewing with three year olds! Your phrase, “the ultimate impetus of love” is to me the essential element in teaching (I know I echo you in this belief!). I always love the fairy houses and it was so special to see them in process a short while ago. Of course, they were static, on shelves – to see the photos of the children in action is truly lovely. I will cherish the idea of a “caring provocation” – thank you for that passage. Thank you for this fabulous post!!

  3. Ayesha
    Posted March 5, 2014 at 7:05 am | #

    Hello Marla,

    This is lovely and inspiring to a beginning teacher such as myself. Many things struck me as things I’d like to incorporate into my practice as a teacher such as
    “It is theirs because the very intentional long-term studio practice and habits have transformed them into children that are independently able to take the next step on their own, or with the help of a friend. They are able to build upon their competencies and go deeper.”

    Thank you for sharing a glimpse into your classroom.

  4. Kirsten
    Posted March 25, 2014 at 8:02 am | #

    I agree with Maurice – thank you, Marla, for yet another intense Provocation.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx